Milele Commemorative Issue 2020

Features:

She was diminutive in size, extremely well read, clear in vision, committed in purpose and powerful in action, with an irritatingly wonderful voice that spoke truth, justice, faith, encouragement, loyalty, joy, support, correction and love. To the world, her name was Milele Chikasa Anana, but I simply called her Mother. :
Milele’s life was a gift to us all
Milele Chikasa Anana returned to the ancestors on May 6 after a long illness. The illustrious publisher of UMOJA Magazine, civil rights activist and Madison village matriarch was 86.
I must be honest. I have not been able to properly grieve the loss of my mentor, Milele Chikasa Anana.
Ihave the November 2011 edition of UMOJA Magazine in my hands to hold the precious memory of my first and only time to be on the cover of this stellar magazine.
She appeared in the office wearing a long, flowered skirt with a lite yellow top that matched the flowers in her skirt. Standing erect she turned her shoulders slightly to address Marie, my office manager and stated: “I am Milele Chikasa Anana, publisher and editor of UMOJA Magazine.” The statement carried a pinch of pride.
I need you to go to New York with me this weekend.” That is what Ms. Milele said after saying hello. I was at work at the Urban League, looking out my window onto the parking lot. “What?” I said. “I am going to the Harlem Fine Arts Show and I need you to come with me.” It was Super Bowl weekend and I had plans to eat a lot of cheese and watch the game. I also felt like I didn’t have as much get up and go as I had the other times, I accompanied her to the East Coast, but she did say New York.
When I was asked to write a tribute to Milele Chikasa Anana, I got an instant case of anxiety. What would I say? Her presence was so profound, and she havd such a lasting impact on so many people. How could I impart such a summary that would be worthy of her legacy? The trepidation overcame me, and I felt completely stuck in this task.
Milele Chikasa Anana passed away on her terms, as she lived her life. I’m thankful I was able to see her one last time and in a moment of lucidity she told me as she always did, “don’t stop, never give up,” which we don’t.
When Bettye Latimer approached Godwin Amegashie in the winter of 1994 and asked him to perform the libations at her naming ceremony, she was asking him to do more than a ritual pouring ̶ she was asking him to help her to freedom.

UMOJA Inside:


‘The Legacy of a Freedom Fighter’

She was diminutive in size, extremely well read, clear in vision, committed in purpose and powerful in action, with an irritatingly wonderful voice that spoke truth, justice, faith, encouragement, loyalty, joy, support, correction and love. To the world, her name was Milele Chikasa Anana, but I simply called her Mother. :



Effort Underway to Rename Madison’s Falk Elementary in Honor of Milele Chikasa Anana

Richard Scott spearheaded an effort to rename Madison’s Falk Elementary School to honor his longtime friend and community Village Mother, the late Milele Chikasa Anana. The icon publisher and editor of UMOJA Magazine, a trailblazing publication that highlighted the achievements of Black people across Madison, was passionate about education. She fervently wanted the youth to love their culture and heritage, while striving to be the best versions of themselves in life.



Family is Everything



A Purposeful Life

Milele’s life was a gift to us all



Tributes to Milele



Madison’s Milele Rest in Glory

Cover Artist:Portrait is a gift by Madison Artist Jerry Jordan



Milele Chikasa Anana: An Icon for Racial and Social Justice, the Champion of Our Good News Peacefully Passed Away at Home

Milele Chikasa Anana returned to the ancestors on May 6 after a long illness. The illustrious publisher of UMOJA Magazine, civil rights activist and Madison village matriarch was 86.



UMOJA Publisher/Editor: Celebrating the Legendary Milele Chikasa Anana

I must be honest. I have not been able to properly grieve the loss of my mentor, Milele Chikasa Anana.



Milele Chikasa Anana: She Lived for the Benefit of Her People — Black People

Ihave the November 2011 edition of UMOJA Magazine in my hands to hold the precious memory of my first and only time to be on the cover of this stellar magazine.



Milele Was There When Others Scattered

She appeared in the office wearing a long, flowered skirt with a lite yellow top that matched the flowers in her skirt. Standing erect she turned her shoulders slightly to address Marie, my office manager and stated: “I am Milele Chikasa Anana, publisher and editor of UMOJA Magazine.” The statement carried a pinch of pride.



“Live Each Day as if it Were Your Last”

I need you to go to New York with me this weekend.” That is what Ms. Milele said after saying hello. I was at work at the Urban League, looking out my window onto the parking lot. “What?” I said. “I am going to the Harlem Fine Arts Show and I need you to come with me.” It was Super Bowl weekend and I had plans to eat a lot of cheese and watch the game. I also felt like I didn’t have as much get up and go as I had the other times, I accompanied her to the East Coast, but she did say New York.



Milele Chikasa Anana: Black Dollars Matter!

When I was asked to write a tribute to Milele Chikasa Anana, I got an instant case of anxiety. What would I say? Her presence was so profound, and she havd such a lasting impact on so many people. How could I impart such a summary that would be worthy of her legacy? The trepidation overcame me, and I felt completely stuck in this task.



We all need to channel Ms. Milele’s spirit right now more than ever.

Milele Chikasa Anana passed away on her terms, as she lived her life. I’m thankful I was able to see her one last time and in a moment of lucidity she told me as she always did, “don’t stop, never give up,” which we don’t.



Milele Loved Her Community



A Rare and Sparkling Jewel

When Bettye Latimer approached Godwin Amegashie in the winter of 1994 and asked him to perform the libations at her naming ceremony, she was asking him to do more than a ritual pouring ̶ she was asking him to help her to freedom.



Brush with Fame

Dr. Winslow Sargeant, Managing Director of S&T, LLC and Barack Obama, the 44th U.S. president, and the first African American leader of this country. Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin Minister Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. Tommy G. Thompson, 42nd governor of Wisconsin. Award-winning writer Nikki Giovanni, one of the best known and most [...]