July 2020

Features:

UMOJA Magazine partnered with the Office of Equity, Partnerships and Engagement, in collaboration with Madison Metropolitan School District’s Black Excellence Think Tank, to provide this special Youth Voices issues. We recognized back in April the need to give middle and high schoolers a space to comfortably express how the coronavirus pandemic disrupted their lives. We did so through a series of virtual workshops including visual arts, poetry/spoken word, storytelling and news reporting.
The coronavirus pandemic catapulted into the spotlight countless health care workers including physicians, nurses, technicians, and hospital support staff, as well as first responders and others who provide essential services and products. Rightfully so. They risk their own lives to save the lives of others each day with their commitment, dedication, and professionalism.
The first lessons taught to toddlers in most households are to be kind to others. Wait your turn. Remember to share. In some communities, those simple social etiquette conversations stop there. But, in communities of color, especially Black households, parental guidance can mean the difference between life and death. For generations, “the talk” has been a staple of African American life.
It can be hard to talk to your children about racism. Some parents worry about exposing their children to issues like racism and discrimination at an early age. Others shy away from talking about something they themselves might not fully understand or don’t feel comfortable discussing.
The resurgence of Black Lives Matter, following the public killing of George Floyd, has motivated creative activism among Madison’s youth demanding a voice for social change. Plywood-covered businesses along State Street, most closed during coronavirus closures and looting, became ideal canvasses for talented artists supporting the protests police brutality and systemic racism.
As protesters spilled onto Madison streets, spurred by outrage from the brutal killing of George Floyd, a young man grabbed a megaphone speaker and began speaking from the heart..
Hey Black Child Do you know who you are

UMOJA Inside:


Youth Voices Project

Cover: Photo by Hadja Barry of 2-year-old daughter, Zozo



UMOJA Publisher/Editor: Youth Voices Matter, Too

UMOJA Magazine partnered with the Office of Equity, Partnerships and Engagement, in collaboration with Madison Metropolitan School District’s Black Excellence Think Tank, to provide this special Youth Voices issues. We recognized back in April the need to give middle and high schoolers a space to comfortably express how the coronavirus pandemic disrupted their lives. We did so through a series of virtual workshops including visual arts, poetry/spoken word, storytelling and news reporting.



UMOJA Teams Up with MMSD’s Black Excellence Project to Give Voice to Voiceless

The coronavirus pandemic catapulted into the spotlight countless health care workers including physicians, nurses, technicians, and hospital support staff, as well as first responders and others who provide essential services and products. Rightfully so. They risk their own lives to save the lives of others each day with their commitment, dedication, and professionalism.



“The Talk”: It’s Strict and Necessary

The first lessons taught to toddlers in most households are to be kind to others. Wait your turn. Remember to share. In some communities, those simple social etiquette conversations stop there. But, in communities of color, especially Black households, parental guidance can mean the difference between life and death. For generations, “the talk” has been a staple of African American life.



Talking to your kids about racism

It can be hard to talk to your children about racism. Some parents worry about exposing their children to issues like racism and discrimination at an early age. Others shy away from talking about something they themselves might not fully understand or don’t feel comfortable discussing.



There is Beauty in Times of Darkness

The resurgence of Black Lives Matter, following the public killing of George Floyd, has motivated creative activism among Madison’s youth demanding a voice for social change. Plywood-covered businesses along State Street, most closed during coronavirus closures and looting, became ideal canvasses for talented artists supporting the protests police brutality and systemic racism.



Meet Tomorrow’s Change-Makers

As protesters spilled onto Madison streets, spurred by outrage from the brutal killing of George Floyd, a young man grabbed a megaphone speaker and began speaking from the heart..



“Hey, Black Child”

Hey Black Child Do you know who you are



Juneteenth Flag Flown Over Wisconsin State Capitol for the First Time

The Juneteenth Flag, celebrating the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the U.S., was hoisted high above the Wisconsin Capitol for the first time in state history, as the founder of Madison’s Juneteenth Day celebration burst with joy.



Juneteenth Tribute to Dr. Ronald “Doc” Myers

If Juneteenth becomes a national holiday, most of the credit must go to “Doc” Myers. Until his death in 2018, Dr. Ronald Myers was the leader of the campaign to make Juneteenth a National Day of Observance. Today 46 states have made Juneteenth a state holiday or observance because of Doc’s relentless campaign.



Defending Black Girlhood

The statistics are startling. An estimated 64,000 Black women and girls have disappeared in the United States without a trace, according to the Black and Missing Foundation.



Dr. Eric Wilcots is First African American Named Dean of College of Letters & Science

Eric Wilcots has been selected as the next dean of the College of Letters & Science, the largest academic unit at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.



Now is the Time… To Invest

Decisions and starting points are important. And if we could always make the right decision at exactly the right time, our lives would be set. Just imagine if we knew exactly whom and when to marry, whether and when to have children and which job would optimize our career trajectory. Unfortunately, life doesn’t work that way. We have to weigh and time our decisions based on the best information we have available, and then we have to “take the plunge” and hope for the best.



10 Tips For Collecting Art On A Shoestring Budget from Black Art In America’s 25 most active collectors

The Art World has witnessed works by African American artists reach unprecedented national and international market demand. Everyday, Black Art In America (BAIA) receives new emails from individuals wanting to learn how and who to start collecting. So, if you’re ready to build your collection but not quite ready to spend the $21 million P. Diddy spent on his Kerry James Marshall, here are 10 tips from BAIA’s 25 most active collectors.



3 Ways to Support Young African American Entrepreneurs

African American owned businesses comprise one of the fastest growing segments of entrepreneurship in the U.S. But they’ve also been hardest hit by the COVID-19 economic crisis, experiencing a 41% drop in business ownership, as a new Working Paper (27309) from the National Bureau of Economic Research reveals.



UMOJA SHORTS — July 2020

Mario White Appointed Dane County Circuit Court Judge Mario White is Dane County Circuit Court judge. He was appointed in June by Gov. Tony Evers to fill a vacancy created by Judge William Hanrahan’s resignation.  “I am humbled and honored to be appointed to the Dane County bench by Governor Evers. The need for a [...]